In Which we may have Redemption for the Redeemer (fingers crossed and weather permitting)

heaven-02.jpgPost 32 – Bumper New Manager Edition! Save Yourselves Now!!

Hello folks. Been a while.

I give you; Senta, Elizabeth, Elsa/Lohengrin, Brunhilde, Tristan, Sachs, Parsifal, Davy Moyes, David Sullivan, West Ham Fans, The West Ham Way.

That’s a bit of a list of saviours and/or entities seeking salvation.

Forget Bob Marley, no-one does redemption like Wagner. In trying to make any sort of sense of the operas (sorry, music-dramas) within his oeuvre (and they’re chock-a-block with insight, if not sense), Don finds it helpful to keep the concept Redemption, front and central. Then all one need do, is work out who needs redeeming, whose doing it and why.

Not into the West Ham thing? Skip about ten paragraphs…

Likewise, in the enduring Stratford soap opera, West Ham are in need of help. Big time. Never mind the results, we seem to have lost our way, our hearts, our focus, our cohesiveness, our home, our ability to sprint and unless we have a care, our roots and our soul. For West Ham (though don’t all clubs claim this?), has always been more than eleven players kicking a football; we have (or had) ..soul.

And to whom have we turned for our salvation? A man equally in need of at the very least, a good makeover, if not a blood transfusion. David Moyes, of no fixed abode, whose last three endeavours; at Man Utd, Real Sociedad and Sunderland, were if not outright failures, perched upon that end of the spectrum. He too is in need of a bit of a leg up. In His words, He has something to prove.

Can two lost souls meeting at the crossroads of life really be mutually redeeming? Or do we have two screaming blokes, colliding and hugging in quicksand? Their combined shackles entwining and hauling them both below the viscous depths?

CLEAVON LITTLE & CHARLES MCGREGOR BLAZING SADDLES (1974)

I don’t know, Don doesn’t know.

But we have an initial premise to test. Has He been brought in to save our souls? Were David Brent here, he’d probably dredge up the old “impossible is immediate, miracles take a little longer.” Poor old Davy M has just 6 months to save himself and WHUFC. So preservation of soul may be a little dramatic (not to say ambitious), what we’re talking here is Premier League status, where a win is a win is a win and be that with soul, Mo’town or R&B, no-one gives a stuff.

If that is the extent of our horizons, we may have got the right guy.

For when it comes to steely eyed, forthrightedness, roll up your sleeves, tracky bottoms and give me 5 laps and 100 press-ups…. Davy is your man. And we do need quite a bit of that. The stats that have (coincidentally?) come out this week have really just borne out what us ITK types have known for some time (via players we couldn’t possibly name) and to what the plebs that go to games is simply the bleeding obvious; we ain’t fit.

As much as we all loved Slav (and Don is as up for a bit of bro’mo as much the next guy – see below..), it is something of a fucking disgrace to see team after team out fight us, especially towards the end of the game.

Having said that (for you Seinfeld fans), I’m sure even under Sam, I recall any number of average teams looking fitter, passing crisper and being better than us. Maybe that’s pessimist me.

So to ignore that slight fly in the ointment, Don was quite impressed with Him at the press conference. Honest, urgent, footballing guy, whom (whom is good, if only we knew where to put it) has enough in the bank from Everton days for us to think he can inspire the 25 pretty talented blokes he has available.

To take an oversimplified case in point, Zaha’s last second goal that deprived us of 2 points at Palace; he shouldn’t have been allowed to turn, he shouldn’t have been allowed to shoot. Everyone should have been about a yard more bothered than they were.

Even before that, ignoring criticism of Antonio because that’s too easy and obvious, various Palace players should have been fouled in their half and the game won.

Its a little bizarre to reference naivety in a manager successful at  international level for several years, but the way Bilic had us set up for our own corner against Liverpool was almost laughable. Once the ball floated in it was 50/50 if we or they won the header; but once Liverpool did, the odds were quickly stacked for them to score some 90 metres away. Such was the paucity of our defensive cover. And those poor souls raised on a diet of West Ham over the last three years, know this was no isolated incident.

Though at this point; a word or two in support of Slaven are in order. For we come to praise Caesar, not to dig him up and bury him again.

1. He brought in and for our purposes, discovered, Payet. If the West Ham Way means anything (and of course it doesn’t), it is Dimitri Payet gracing Upton Park and the current fishbowl. Not since Di Canio or Joe Cole in his youthful pomp, have we seen anything like Payet and nor will we do so again as far as the eye can see. Presumably other managers also noted he created an abundance of chances in France but it was Slav that moved quickly and decisively. For the memories Don and Little Don have of that man, we thank you Slav.

2. The same to a lesser degree applies to Lanzini,  Obiang and Antonio.  Lanzini could easily been overlooked in exotic desert leagues but he wasn’t. A fantastic talent whose entire potential is yet to be realised. Has he always been played in the right position? No. Does he often come too deep to get involved? Yes. But well done Slav for bringing him in. Same with Obiang, Slav’s first signing and probably rubber stamped rather than driven by him. Particularly as if memory serves, obstinacy kept this obvious talent behind Noble in the pecking order for half a season. Antonio, was and to a degree maybe still is, raw talent to be harnessed in the most effective way. Like Obiang he wasn’t an immediate favourite of Slaven’s but came to be such.

All in all, Moyes inherits a decent squad. Thanks Slav.

3. He presided over the best season in Little Don’s living memory. Don is ancient. Not only cutting his teeth on the boys of ’86 but even tasting the delights of Moore, Peters, Brooking, Robson and Devonshire. But for Little Don that last season at Upton Park happened to coincide with our decision to take in a few away games. Father and son, together on the road, seeing the Irons win and/or perform well in unexpected places, counts for something. Thanks Slav. Winning the final ever home games against Chelsea and Liverpool – thanks Slav. For febrile excitement at home to Arsenal – thanks Slav. Winning the final ever game against Spurs at UP – thanks even more Slav. And for that last game ever…..you have Don’s eternal gratitude.

4. What a guy. On the day you get sacked to say it was the right decision and no hard feelings. To say this will always be your club. To say this was more than a job…these are unnecessary words that one only says if they are heartfelt. And with them, he inscribes a place in our hearts. Get your next job Slav but feel free to turn up on the “terraces” with us any time you get. Cheers pal and all the best.

Back to our Redeemer. One season. What are his chances?  First advantage is he doesn’t need to work out the problem. That much s obvious; conceding way too many goals. Yet, we have a good keeper and decent reserve keeper. Reid is a perfectly acceptable Premier League defender, albeit on the creative side he’s no Rio. Similar re Fonte (after a sticky start). Ogbonna; also pretty good, provides left balance and better distribution. Loved what I’ve seen of Rice so far. Zabaletta means we shouldn’t be exposed on the right and Byrom, pretty good back-up. I worry about our defending at left full back. Creswell the better disciplined of the two gets exposed too often. Masuako, for all (and maybe because of) his attacking prowess is no defender, so that needs looking at. Add Kouyate and surely we have something to work with and working and organising defences is Moyes territory.

 

We live or die in front of our defence. In Don’s opinion we have one classy operator; Obiang and two that are played there that don’t have a defensive mentality. One is Kouyate a supreme athlete who if he is to fulfil the role has to stop getting wrong side and the other, the Captain who whatever his talents, never could think defensively and less so now his legs have gone (by Premier League standards).  So if all teams need a Kante, we are short and maybe where we head in January, especially if Carvalho remains an option.

Further forward, why shouldn’t we be ok? There is strength in depth and in variety.

Then youth. At Everton, Moyes had a reputation of giving it a chance and there is some talent to call upon. But lets not kid ourselves, he needs results and quick which is not typically fertile ground for blooding the kids.

So squad-wise give or take, He and we have a chance.

Another plus, is that the spirit also seems willing. Even though Slav looked a dead man walking for maybe a month, which must impact on the players even at subliminal level, they gave the impression they remained behind him. Much of this Don expects is because they liked the guy, which is a little surprising in this mercenary age but appeared to be the case. So also good.

Not so good is the amount of games pre-Christmas and the opposition strength in that run-in. If this goes bad we could be bottom and even detached by Christmas which will increase the panic and substantially reduce the effectiveness of the January window. Frankly if we are not in the bottom three come Jan 1st, Moyes will have done well. Probably comes down to home games against Leicester and Newcastle and picking up something (anything) at Watford, Bournemouth and Stoke, none of whom are bad teams and all capable of beating us.

Also challenging is the potential toxicity of the London Stadium. Us fans need to take full responsibility for the crap atmosphere, though if we had something to cheer, maybe ten thousand wouldn’t religiously head for Gidea Park on 80 minutes. Gidea Park must be a hell of a place.

Without wanting to labour the downside, also not so good is Him having to deal with our management hierarchy but hey, that’s the gig.

So Don on behalf of his family and the whole Don community (his family), welcomes Mr Moyes. Forgive the formality but we have more than enough Davids as it is. Wagner fans will know from Die Meistersinger how one can get mixed up over Davids. We’d like the one from the picture please, that slew Goliath.

Do your job, keep us up and we’ll get on fine. The West Ham Way can probably wait until next season.

Okay, West Ham fans, you are free to go. Any Wagner devotees that are still with us, Die Zeit ist da. Anyone that combines both, contact me immediately….we have so much to discuss.

So…Erlösung dem Erlöser, as until 1903 they could only say in Bayreuth. Redemption to the Redeemer. Don is too exhausted with West Ham to embark on a serious study of redemption in the mature ten and frankly there are thousands out there far better equipped to do so but maybe for a bit of fun, lets have a a quick peek at who is redeeming who(m).

Der Fliegende Hollander. Wagner’s youthful offering. This seems straightforward. The Dutchman (beautifully named only thus), is in desperate need of salvation. Not of course to walk off into the sunset, that would be too Disney but to finally sustain death (and keep that in mind for future works). Having made his pact with the devil, his only out is to find a women that will be true to him, Step forward Senta.

Tannhäuser. In modern parlance Heinrich  Tannhäuser is desperate to be saved from his porn addiction. He longs for the time when pleasure was not an orgy but the trees, the meadows and pleasant walks with Elizabeth. Resorting to a couple of Hail Marys he eventually escapes the clutches of Venus and her domain in Venusberg. But his old buddies on the outside are sooo boring, how can they be salvation? Elizabeth, a wonderful combination of both worlds, offers  real salvation but Tann is to dopey to see it and decides only the Pope in Rome is the answer, which it isn’t. For all the tremendous music, Tannhäuser as a piece, doesn’t really convince because neither of the worlds he’s stuck between seem terribly attractive and following Wagner’s pimping up of the Venus music for Paris, Don finds himself rooting for the dark side. So no salvation and we dont really care.

Lohengrin. Elsa is accused of royal fratricide and faces serious consequences unless she has a champion to defend her. Of all the best legal brains and top soldiers there must have been in 13th century Brabant, she chooses as her saviour, some knight that she saw in a dream. As you do. And yet, bugger me sideways, he turns up and does the business. We don’t find out his name (see Dutchman above) until the very end but you won’t be surprised to learn its Lohengrin. So some obvious saving there, which is tricky amidst the machinations of Ortrud, evil purveyor of the dark arts who not only seeks the throne for he family but who also gets most of the best lines.

But lets look at this guy Lohengrin. A more one dimensional cardboard cut-out you couldn’t wish to meet. Won’t tell anyone his name or anything about himself. Only if Elsa asks the question, will he spill the beans but he must then disappear.  So if Elsa wants to keep him as her champ (in every respect…), she needs to put a lid on that curiosity and get back to blind faith.

Of course it ends badly and he has to return to Montsalvat and guard that grail. But beneath that silvery cardboard exterior, one suspects Lohengrin, was desperate to be saved from his cardboard existence. Elsa wasn’t quite up to the job. All very allegorical of our attitude to religion and art. Plus music to die for…..and to.

The Ring Cycle. Four operas joined together for one story and if you think Don is going to (has ability to) pick out the various acts of salvation in a couple of paragraphs, you’ve another think coming. Brunhilde is a decent bet for saviour but she along with the most of the rest of the cast need saving, primarily (from himself), Wotan, king of the gods.

Tristan & Isolde. Their love is so far beyond the rule of law, any form of morality, metaphysics and life itself, that any consideration of salvation is futile.

Die Meistersinger von Nurnberg. Well Sachs saves: the day, the headstrong couple, the community, artistic traditions as well as artistic flair so I guess he must be the saviour.  Underlined by orchestral and other references to John the Baptist. He does so willingly and at the expense of his own happiness but lets not head  down any Schopenhauer rabbit holes at this point. What he’s saving them from is interesting to some…pedantry, Wahn (no, we’re down the rabbit hole again – touched on in post 22 and others), art critics, the French, (the Jews??), urbanisation and I’m sure others.

Parsifal. The final line of Wagner’s final opera is Redemption to the Redeemer. We can safely say that Parsifal is a if not the redeemer. He has re-united the holy relics and so saved the Grail community, including of course Amfortas. He has redeemed Kundry and allowed her curse like that of the Dutchman, to finally be lifted so she can die in peace. Depending on one’s take on the whole piece, one may say it is cleansing and cathartic for audiences and the whole world.

But does Parsifal himself need redeeming, for that is the heavy hint of the final line? He is a sinner from when he did not understand the concept of sin. He left his mother to suffer alone, breaking her heart and he shot the swan. The latter a sin of equal measure now Wagner is embracing a Buddhist and vegetarian agenda. He redeems himself in that he awakens to the concept of sin and other people’s suffering and then more graphicly, Kundry washes his feet with her hair. Kundry is therefore both in need of redemption and is a redeemer but it is doubtful that the last line is devoted to her.

Of course, Wagner himself needs redemption (boy, does he), though I’ve not seen much sign of him seeking that, unless one counts vicariously through characters. He believes he’s saved opera and because of its elevated status (in his eyes), art itself. By the time he finally came to produce Parsifal, I doubt he still felt art could radically change society, as he did twenty years earlier. But for the gift of his oeuvre for humanity, does he think he’s been redeemed?

 

If you have been, thanks for listening.

COYI! 

©DonnertheHammer.com 2017

In Which its giant killing season; the Hammers take on Man City and Don tackles Die Meistersinger (part 1)

Post 19

All we needed was a bit of luck for an FA Cup run. Hundred and something teams to choose from but bugger my old boots if we don’t draw Man City. So that’s that then. Half a season, where the pinnacle of our existence is fighting relegation. Just shoot me now or pass me that Schopenhauer essay. So, in recognition of our huge undertaking in the cup, Don attempts to tackle one of the biggest of the big in the opera world – Die Meistersinger von Nürmberg. A bit of West Ham below but its mainly pwoppa culture this time.

Meistersingers is big in every sense. Packed full of controversy, its long – even by Wagnerian standards. It fills the stage, it requires a full orchestra. The Ring you say? Well ok not that big obviously but that’s four operas put together. Unlike another biggy, Tristan, which packs a huge punch but only has 3 or 4 main characters, Meistersingers is chock-a-block with leading characters, a dozen lesser ones, chorus, dancers, fighters, jugglers; you name it, its got it. This reflects, and this is something to bear in mind throughout, that its about a community, so it stars a community. Consequently its expensive to put it on and doesn’t come around too often. In short, its a right production.

But stick with it my friends and there are rewards beyond heaven.

Of course its a forlorn task. One cannot do any sort of justice to Die Meistersinger in a short blog so this is little more than some random thoughts. This time setting the scene and next time, maybe for Burnley (come on you Irons, we need that win!), interpretation and commentary (which is of course the whole point).

Lets start with the controversies and off the top of my head…

  • Its set in Nürmberg or Nuremberg as we would have it. Like a Hans Sachs poem, that counts for something. Nuremberg, the place in which the main raft of anti-Jewish legislation was first enacted by the Nazis. Nuremberg, site of the huge Nazi rallies, choreographed in part based on some of Wagner’s stage direction. This was no accident; Hitler adored Wagner and saw in this opera an idealised German community, pure in thought and deed and free from foreign influences. Nuremberg, site of the post-war trials where a few Nazis (not enough) got what was coming to them. Nuremberg, flattened in hours by allied bombs near the end of the war.
  • In the last scene, the great hero, Hans Sachs and I hope to show he is indeed a hero, presents a monologue, warning the burghers of Nuremberg against anti-German art and foreign influence. What a god-send for Hitler and more so because it was written mid 19th century, not 1932.
  • The anti-hero is Sixtus Beckmesser, the pedantic town clerk who is mocked throughout and receives appropriate comeuppance. Cleverer people than Don recognise Jewish traits in Beckmesser and cast the entire kit and caboodle as a thinly disguised anti-Jewish tirade, This they say, is to be expected as Wagner was an outrageous anti-Semite. And indeed he was.

So these beg two questions;

  1. Should Wagner and particularly Die Meistersinger be damned because of the adoption by the Nazis? and
  2. To what extent should evaluation of art be affected by by the personal traits of the artist?

To consider these we need a reasonable understanding of the material.

Setting the Scene

  1. It is in a minority among Wagner operas in that it is set in a fixed time and place and deals with real people. Wagner preferred myth. Myth is timeless; if one is trying to convey thought process and emotion, real events can be a distraction. Wotan is not a particular person, he is every-man; what Tristan and Isolde go through resonates in all of us so powerfully because it cannot be confined to time and space. Meistersingers however is set in Nuremberg and because it is 16th century Nuremberg, the city itself is a character (in the way Brabant in Lohengrin is not). How so? Well, at that time, it was pretty much the capital of the faltering Holy Roman Empire and so as one would expect, Church was pivotal and it was a centre of commerce; but it also had a pretty unique reverence for art. The “Master singers” did exist. They were real people representing various guilds and trades; they were considered to be masters of poetry and song and this gave them an exalted position in society.
  2. The time was significant. This decade of the 16th century was when Nuremberg and much of Europe began to recover from the ravages of the plague. Hans Sachs was a real person who lost his wife and all children to the plague. He re-married and had further kids but the opera is set in the year or two in which he had lost everything. The time is also significant in that it is set centuries before German statehood (see below).
  3. It was written in mid 1860’s just a few years before the unification of Germany. There was a nationalist fervour. This, Don feels, is why most of the controversy arises. Having lived through subsequent events, it is nigh on impossible , especially when it comes to Wagner, for us to appraise pre-Nazi German art other than as a pre-cursor to the Nazis nor 19th century nationalism, especially German nationalism other than in racist or proto-fascist terms. But if we are to judge Die Meistersinger on its own terms, this we must do. This means understanding what German nationalism meant back then and this point must be (and of course is) made in any appraisal of Wagner’s works and of him personally.
  4. Its a comedy! There are more lighter moments in Wagner operas than one may generally assume but this is his lightest and most jocular. It is also bursting with great, accessible music; arguably more than any other opera.
  5. Don’t let the time/space specifics fool you. It is highly allegoric, still dealing with highly charged senses and emotions. However, unlike say Tristan where by the end, one may feel like an emotional punch bag from which it may take a week to recover, most on leaving the theatre after Meistersingers, will feel uplifted, walking on air and ready to take on the world.  They may not know why they feel that way but you might after reading this. Don’s a modest chap.

Brief Synopsis

Act 1. Walter, a knight from Franconia, arrives as a stranger in Nuremberg and spots Eva in church (St Katherine’s – sadly subsequently flattened by allied bombs). He asks her if she is engaged. How rude says her chaperone (Lena). I can speak for myself thank you, says Eva. Its complicated because her father, Pogner (not Pogba but call him that if it helps), richest bloke in town and Meistersinger has offered his daughter’s hand in marriage to the winner of a singing competition to be held next day on Johannestag (midsummer’s day) provided, that Eva can veto anyone she doesn’t like. After several winks and sultry pouts from Eva, Walter decides he will enter the competition. No chance! says Lena, its for Meistersingers only. So I’ll become a Meistersinger, says Walter. No chance! says Lena but seeing as it looks important to my boss Eva, my boyfriend David will help you. He’s apprenticed to Hans Sachs, the cobbler and best poet going so if he can’t help, no-one can.

It becomes immediately apparent to David that Walter has no understanding of the voluminous rules, regulations, ritual and convention, necessary to be a Meistersinger. He has studied nothing but has simply listened to birdsong. It takes years and Walter expects to do it in a night? We soon see how he does because that night there is a “trial” before the Die Meistersinger to see if anyone can be admitted to their number. The weighty conventions are again explained and its time for Walter’s song. A Meistersinger is on rota to listen out for mistakes. Its Beckmesser’s turn to be Der Merker and he sits with his slate and chalk ready to note errors. More than seven and you’re versunken. The not so hidden agenda is Beckmesser also fancies Eva and hopes to sing to win in tomorrow’s contest. He doesn’t need this handsome young  upstart rival from Franconia. Walter breaks all the rules because he just sings impulsively. The Meistersingers reject him utterly; save one, Hans Sachs the cobbler. Sachs recognises that something this new and fresh plays by its own rules. Nevertheless, he is a lone voice and Walter is effectively out the game.

Act 2. Its twilight and because its Midsummer’s Eve, mischievous spirits are at play. The town is agog for the next day festivities, particularly this year with the best looker in town to be bride to an unknown groom. Much drinking and frolicking about the town. David breaks the bad news re Walter to Eva and Lena. It is also plain that Beckmesser will enter and they’ve heard that (what with the proviso and all), he plans to serenade her this evening to see if he can woo her. Eva and Lena hatch a plan to swap roles so Beckmesser will be unwittingly serenading Lena. There follows a touching scene between Eva and Sachs. They discuss a number of important subjects, all in the guise of shoe repair (if nothing else, you leave this opera with a good working knowledge of soles, pitch and wax).

  • why Sachs a widower, is not entering the competition. Her charms are very apparent to him and for her, well he’s been the guiding mentor of her life and quite handsome to boot. But no, the age gap is too great and Eva is now pretty taken with Walter.
  • will he abandon her to the horrid Beckmesser?
  • was Walter utter rubbish? Can nothing be done?
  • why is Sachs being so horrible and not helping?

Night closes in. Eva secretly meets Walter in an alley next to her house. Much despair re news he’s messed up the competition. Only answer is elopement and it better be tonight. They hear Beckmesser tuning up. Eva thinks she will throw up. Walter wants to beat him up.

Fortunately Sachs hears all and in guise of some outdoor late night shoe-mending (he’s reparing Beckmesser’s shoes for the big day tomorrow), sufficiently interrupts the serenade with a very loud cobbler song about Eve (Eva) leaving the Garden of Eden without any shoes and hurting her feet. This has following intended effects

  • annoys Beckmesser
  • secretly tells Eva not to elope as he’ll work something out for her and Walter
  • alerts his apprentice David upstairs to the fact that Beckmesser is actually serenading his girl Lena.

Cue pandemonium, a mass punch-up (by this time half the town is off its face drunk- mischievous spirits? – yeah, right) and the curtain ends Act 2.

Act 3. Johannestag – Midsummer’s day. Last night’s mischievous spirits have been burned off by the sun. Will Hans Sachs resolve all of last night’s problems, just as his namesake, John the Baptiste, for whom the day is named,  redeemed believers with baptism? Sachs, the poet cobbler, sits in his workshop reading. He thinks aloud the “wahn” monologue in which he observes the madness that is human nature, compelling us all to ultimately self destruct in a frenzy of striving for something unknown and unknowable. All very Schopenhauerian and a marvellous passage in opera; Wagner at his most effective. Sachs cannot stop the madness but can he try to guide it in the cause of something noble? Lets see. He receives a series of visitors:

  • first up Walter, who slept little but deep and well and had a wonderful dream. Sachs senses a plan and as Walter tells (sings) his dream, Sachs is interpreting, prodding moulding it to conform with some basic rules and hey presto there is the embryo of a master song. It will need work though. Walter you’ve done a great job with the initial verses, go away and think of a third verse to resolve the meaning and bring it together. Meanwhile…
  • Beckmesser, fresh from last nights beating but determined to woo to success, comes for his shoes. In Sachs’ absence, he sees the draft of Walter’s song and assumes that Sachs is entering the competition and that last night’s ruckus was a ruse by Sachs to eliminate the competition (Beckmessser). Sachs enters and a plan formulates; he denies (truthfully) that the song is his and to show good faith,  says Beckmesser can use it in the competition if he wishes. Initially cynical, the scribe ultimately gleefully takes it, for a song by Sachs, that counts for something and will have a better chance than his own effort. Be careful says Sachs, that song needs subtle handling (he suspects Beckmesser is not up to that). Exit town scribe and enter…
  • Eva. More shoe talk that is allegoric for far more worldly matters, on topics similar to when they last met. Amid shoe fitting, Walter’s back. Cue glazed look and misty eyes between the (spoiler alert) soon to be lovers. Sachs also sees that as much as he loves Eva, he’s got no chance now she’s got Walteritis. It probably doesn’t help that she tells him she’d definitely have chosen him if not for gorgeous chops over here, who’s 20 years younger. So he focuses on being noble and working out how Walter can win a competition he’s not allowed to enter. First up Walt, lets get that song finished.

That done, there follows a lovely scene in which the song is christened (and baptised – it is Johannestag after all), Eva and Walter are told the plan and Lena and David get engaged. In short, if all goes well at the festival all problems will be solved, save that Sachs remains alone but has done the right thing, the Schopenhauerian thing.

And its off to the festival for the competition!

The only competitor is Beckmesser; cue Eva disappointment but she knows she can veto. He has Walter’s half baked song that Beckmesser think is by Sachs. He applies his own music and of course the many stifling rules of Die Meistersinger; this make a pigs ear of the whole thing and he is laughed off court. Its not mine, he exclaims, its Sachs! Sachs!!?? exclaim all, surely he would not write such rubbish. Sachs takes the floor. “I agree that sounded crap but as my reputation is on trial, at least let me call a witness; the true author of the song and who will show that if properly delivered it will sound wonderful”. Enter Walter, not as competitor but as witness, sings wonder song, redeems Sachs’ reputation and the community insist he must also take the prize. The girl was always mine, he says (and Eva readily agrees) but I don’t need to be a Meistersinger who have been boorish to me. They are all rules and no impro – and I’m an impro man. Steady says Sachs. Impro is good but you have to respect what tradition can do and you will be improved by having a good blend of the two. Cue dodgy monologue (see controversies) re respecting German art, German Meisters and beware foreigners. Townsfolk all say well done Sachs, you saved the day. And well done Johannestag, you saw off the mischievous spirits of Johannesnacht.

Bish, bash bosh. much applause and we go home.

So you get the picture. Many points of discussion which we will do next time. There’s no rush, we don’t play City until January.

Meantime, Slav has been given the dreaded vote of confidence. Everyone is laughing at us but hey, Don says its the mischievous spirits of Midsummer’s Night that are lingering far too long and as next is Liverpool away, they may hang about a bit more. But then Burnley at home and we, Slav and the whole of east London shall be redeemed. you heard it here first.

If you have been, thanks for listening.

COYI!

©DonnertheHammer.com 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Which Don, West Ham and Wotan bid Leb Wohl

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Post 13

Goodbyes are difficult to handle., especially when its family. And as if we didn’t know, last week the West Ham family bade farewell to its home. No-one forced us to leave; like the teenager that has outgrown its bedroom and needs to spread its wings, the time felt right.

If the Ring Cycle can lay claim to being the greatest art work ever created, so the chunk of Act 3 Die Valkyrie, colloquially known as Wotan’s Farewell, can claim to be the apex of that musicological mountain. Its got to be right up there.

More of that below. For now, all things West Ham.

I think the greatest compliment one can make, is that the football stole the show. This isn’t a dig at the “closing ceremony”, which was fine, albeit a little long winded. Whatever the club had arranged for a finale could not have compared to the amazing entertainment that preceded. A perfect synthesis of 11 players, a management team, a few subs and a supporting cast of over 30,000. We came together as one. Its a cliché that the crowd are the 12th man but its inconceivable that the players weren’t inspired by that atmosphere and raised their game.

No need to dwell on the game itself. That is why we have “Tivo” machines and proper journalists. There are no words to convey the white hot excitement. To have lost the last game would not have deflected the club from its trajectory but would have deflated. To have won it, to have beaten every top team this season, (all-right excluding Leicester), confirmed the need to move on. As I say, it felt right. Little Don and I left the old place a little wistfully but brimming with praise and optimism.

Don is confident we can finish in style against Stoke.

Last post Don considered some Upton Park memories and realised he omitted the occasion he scored on the hallowed turf. Back in days of the ye olde west stand, Don’s company was a match ball sponsor. This brings 4 tickets, a photo with a player and a signed football. An hour or so after the game and having consumed a befitting amount of alcohol, our little group became aware that we were a wrong turn out of the bar and and a few short steps to the pitch. The floodlights were still on and we had a ball. Well, it would have been rude not to! The client took a throw on to the ever alert Don who shimmied past a couple of imaginary defenders before slotting into the far corner in front of an ecstatic (albeit empty) Bobby Moore lower. We were then spotted and red carded. Not that Don condones such disgraceful behaviour but its a comfort in his old age that he has scored a couple less goals at Upton Park than the present manager.

Before moving to Wagner, a few words on the attack on the Man Utd coach. Don was there just after 6; already Barking Road was a street party; police were absent and fans competed with traffic for control of the road. Within minutes the fans had won and the traffic was gridlocked. Some 20 minutes later Don was by the church on Green Street. By this time thousands packed the street yet bizarrely the police who had eventually arrived in some numbers, considered it appropriate to guide buses, EMPTY BUSES down Green Street causing a severe crush in so doing and potentially a very worrying situation. I saw the MU coach, I didn’t see bottles thrown (though they clearly were). My tuppence worth is 1. the police should have been there on time; 2. Green Street and Barking Road should have been closed to traffic (other than player coaches) from 6 and 3. The Club should have opened the gates an hour before it did. The whole mess was easily preventable.

On to another farewell. Any parent must be filled with horror at the unspeakable pain to be endured at the prospect of saying a final goodbye to a child. So befalls Wotan in Act 3 of Die Valkyrie.

Wotan’s relationship with his favourite child Brunhilde is close, deep and spans an untold mythological length of time. Only she was there when he gained his insight; only she so understands him that she almost represents his conciousness. As Wotan may be representative of entire humankind, so Brunhilde may represent the world’s moral compass.

So when she crucially and fundamentally disobeys him, he is angered and dismayed beyond words. His commitment to his wife and the rule of law (often the same thing) means Brunhilde cannot escape the most severe punishment. She is to be stripped of her divinity and as a mere mortal sent to sleep on a mountain top and become the chattel of the first passing thug to find her and wake her. OK, in operatic terms, so far nothing extraordinary, albeit some superb music and one can see it is killing Wotan to have to punish almost a part of himself.

The next phase is the daughter’s pleading to her father. At the level of narrative, we have the philosophical position that whilst she disobeyed his overt order, she remained faithful to his true and unspoken intentions because only Brunhilde really understands Wotan. What she pleads for, is that if she is to be stripped of her godly power, if she is to be cast out and never see her father again, let her be protected on a mountain top by a fierce ring of fire. In this way she would not be at the mercy of the first bloke to wander by but only a supremely brave hero would be able to claim her. This was not only a selfish move but she of course had in mind Siegfried, then en ventre sa mere, who she thought (and thought for Wotan), would when grown up, try to attain what Wotan really desired.  Wotan knew none of this.

And then the melting of the father’s heart. His love for his daughter is unbearable, to lose her, even more so. Yet he must do what he has to do. But he relents and she will be protected in her long sleep by a ring of fire. And so it is time to say goodbye and send her into a sleep that would last 20 years.

Leb Wohl he sings as the emotional levee breaks in about 15 minutes of sublime music in which anyone who has ever said goodbye to a loved one and in particular fathers and daughters, will struggle to hold it together.

whole club

Leb Wohl Boleyn Ground. Thanks for the memories.

COYI!

©DonnertheHammer.com 2016

 

 

In which Don considers the real point of the Ring Cycle, spouses and the West Ham family

Post 9.


©Daily Mail

Hello Peeps.

Don is at his happiest with Mrs Don at his side. Its true she is a bit of a control freak, doesn’t really relate to Don’s mantra of idle mess being next to godliness, her knowledge of Wagner does not extend beyond X Factor and she cares even less. Yet Don doesn’t mind what the others say, he insists that in her own way Mrs Don is lovely and after 26 years, she is still Don’s bird. Imagine then, the unbridled joy at Don Towers, that Mrs Don was to make her final trek (of three in twenty six years) to Upton Park for Mark Noble’s testimonial.

Some say Wotan wasn’t as fortunate with his choice of spouse, Fricka but the opposite also arguably applies. More of that happy couple anon..

So off we trot on a lovely early spring day for a unique West Ham experience. One doesn’t see too many testimonials in these days of enthusiastic agents and signing-on bonuses. So it was pleasant indeed to celebrate Mark’s 10 years at the club and raise a chunk of change for the worthy charities.  And a unique day it was….there were even less away fans than the last time we entertained Wigan and what really appealed to Don, was that it being a bank holiday, the Controlled Parking Zones, the little darlings, sportingly ushered us through and invited us to make ourselves at home. If Carling did testimonials…

I vaguely remember testimonials in the 70’s. Bobby’s maybe was Celtic and Geoff’s was (was it?) some sort of All Star affair. Though my memory of that night is blighted by a dodgy burger sending my pubescent gills a diarrhoea shade of green and throwing up over the steps of the old west stand. Block C if you must know.

For Mark, the West Ham family were out in force and on best behaviour. It had such an end of term feel one worried for our next game (with reason as it transpired). How fantastic it was to see old favourites back on the hallowed turf (back to its resplendent best with recent bald patches having been given comb-overs). But as exciting as it was to see the Paolos and Rios, Don’s fuzzier feelings were derived from seeing the lesser celebrated folk back in claret and blue. Daly, Etherington, Bishop, Lomas, Moncur… I could go on. Not yer tip-top heroes but part of the glue that makes our club so special. There was a palpable feel of the players being excited to be there. Of course they would be. Imagine five, ten years after careers are ended, they have a final opportunity to play at the old ground in front of 35,000 adoring fans. And for us, a chance to say goodbye to players that just sort of drifted off. The game itself was pretty irrelevant, the 6-5 scoreline being only just off-script but chapeau to Deano for that most unscripted touch of genius. Seriously, Harry Kane is the poor man’s Dean Ashton. Oh what might have been….

More than I can remember perhaps ever, there is a feeling that we, the club, the players, the board the fans, are all pulling in the same direction.

All in all what a day. I don’t think Mrs Don and I will ever forget that parking space.

a chunk of Wagner and more footie below..

Regular viewers will recall our occasional musing of the divine. So for our next God in The Ring Cycle, I give you Fricka. Fricka is the Goddess of marriage and fidelity in the Ring Cycle. She is married to Wotan the King of the Gods. Not your ideal husband, he fathers a dozen or so kids, some human, some semi divine; none however with Fricka who is sadly barren.

We get to know her in three scenes; two in Rhinegold and one in Valkyrie. In each she challenges, nay scolds her husband, two scenes are a private dialogue and one is in the company of the other gods. She is a women scorned and does not pass up an opportunity to let him know.

So what does Fricka offer us?

To consider this, we have to consider her husband and his true aspirations because make no mistake, to understand the Ring Cycle, one must understand Wotan (which is a gargantuan task, probably without end).

Superficially, the Cycle is a story of recovery of the stolen gold and its return to the Rhinemaidens. But Wotan was a troubled God on a mission, well before he heard that the gold had been stolen. Why and what was the mission?

Through snippets in the libretto; the riddle dialogue with Mime, the singing and spinning of the Norns, we get clues as to the timeless pre-history to the first opera. From his supping at the stream of knowledge and the stripping of the branch of the tree of the World Ash (the original sin?), Wotan has ruled the world through contracts and the rule of law. But he has become fallible, he has made bad and unfair contracts and through this fallibility he has pre (or early in)-Das Rhinegold, concluded that unless he can change course, the reign of the Gods is morally vacuous and in terminal decline. He had intended Valhalla to be both a symbol of the rule of law and a physical stronghold against challenges to that authority but instead it is a symbol of a bad contract in which he was prepared either to pawn his sister-in-law (goddess of love/youth by the way), or to dupe the giants. Either way, his governance lacks authority and he knows it. This backdrop illuminates for me a serious lesson of the Ring Cycle and a prime relevance to all of us.

For our lives to have meaning, whether we are the governors or the governed, there needs to be a moral structure. If we cheat, are dishonest or immoral, ultimately it is us that is the poorer. The riches that life offers do not lie in hidden treasure but rather in being decent to ones fellows. 

There you have it. Just saved you 16 hours.

For Wotan, at the helm of a ruling elite that lacks moral authority, his choices are either to somehow inject such morality or to hand over power to something more fitting. Either way he has recognised that the current crop of Gods has to go. This is a major simplification and throw a fair bit of Wotan complacency into the mix. Anyway, at this point, we start Das Rheingold (actually he still pretty complacent at scene 2) and fairly soon, Wotan learns that Alberich is in possession of the gold and has created the Ring. Suddenly lofty ideals give way to urgent practical expedience because Alberich in control of the Ring gives rise to another outcome; control of the world by an all-powerful amoral and vengeful thug.

So back to Fricka..

Das Rhinegold scene 2. She admonishes Wotan for contracting to pay the giants with the human trafficking of Fricka’s sister Freia, goddess of youth/love as payment to the giants for building Valhalla. She has no appreciation of the big issues with which Wotan has been grappling but she is naturally shocked and appalled at the bargaining of her sister. Beyond this, she has the myopic and vain hope that with a fine new palace, her husband is more likely to stay home with his wife and the myopic and vain concern that it will stand testament to the shame to the Gods .

Whether Wotan was really prepared to pay the giants with Freia is moot. If he didn’t need Fricka to set out his dilemma she certainly brings the problem into sharp focus.

Next scene and Loge tells the assembled Gods about Alberich, gold etc. But whilst Wotan realises he and Loge need to “retrieve” the gold from Alberich for selfless as well as selfish reasons, Fricka is all to easily swept from sisterly concern to superficial vanity as to what power the gold will bring to the gods and in particular whether the gold might adorn certain female Gods to better keep their husbands loyal. She is oblivious to the real threat.

By the time, Wotan has retrieved the gold, traded it with the giants to release Freia, thought (sword motif) of his Big Idea (Project Siegmund – not yet Siegfried…possibly) and led the Gods to Valhalla, Fricka is disappointed to have lost the gold but is generally a satisfied women, blissfully unaware of the tectonic movements that have been set in motion.

What is Wotan’s Big Idea? The gold (inconsequential) including the Ring (very consequential) is now held by Fafner the giant who has used the Tarnhelm to transform himself into a dragon, better to guard it. Wotan knows the Ring must be recovered. Whilst Fafner is not Alberich he cannot risk his dark counterpart regaining the ring – besides, Wotan just wants it. His overriding issue is to find a suitably moral ending to the Gods reign, so he can’t simply take it by force but Fafner will not relinquish it by other means. The big idea is for a third party, his son Siegmund (by an unnamed human women) to become the hero that will take the Ring from the dragon. It is not spelt out but presumably Wotan trusts Siegmund to then give the Ring to Wotan.

By Die Valkyrie Act 2, we have seen that circumstances have prevailed (Wotan (in human guise) has spent many years training his son), so that Siegmund is the hero warrior, he has met, saved, loved and impregnated his long lost twin sister Sieglinde see Post 7 , recovered the “needed” sword Nothung and is about to duel with Sieglinde’s barbaric husband Hunding. Wotan has sent Brunhilde to protect Siegmund and is confident he will be soon be ready to seek Fafner and regain the Ring. Plan on track.

Enter Fricka. Remember she is Goddess of marriage and fidelity. Not only is she appalled that her adulterous husband’s son has broken up a marriage but has committed incest to boot! This is whom Wotan wants to protect? Houston, we have a problem and No Way Jose.

Lets dispense with the superficiality. The infidelity objections really underscore her own humiliation at the hands of her stay away husband and serial adulterer, so arguably she is not so pro-marriage as pro her own marriage. She fails to see the big issues. For example for Fricka, marriage (loveless or otherwise), is the contract on which a contract based society is based. So she sides with Hunding, an oaf who has forced his wife into marriage and effectual slavery. She cares not one wit for the extra-marital love between Sieglinde and Siegmund. More significantly, she has completely failed to grasp the serious issues weighing on Wotan. It’s about Fricka’s marriage, Fricka’s sister, Fricka’s humiliation. The decline of the Gods is not on her radar.

But for all her inadequacy, she spots something that has not occurred to Wotan and when it does, changes the course of the tetralogy. The Big Idea requires an independent agent. Wotan cannot recover or command the recovery of the Ring because he parted with it under his own contract and for a new moral society , means must shape the end. Siegmund therefore, is the free and independent agent that will do so.

Fricka observes that he is neither free or independent. His warrior training, his meeting with Sieglinde, his procurement of the sword and even his success in duel with Hunding is all engineered by Wotan. Siegmund is a proxy and no more. And so the devastating line….

“in ihm, treff ich nur dich”        In him, I find only you.

In that moment, Wotan sees this for what it is and is wrecked. His Big Idea has no moral authority and therefore must fail. Musically Fricka moves in for the kill; she now sings with a sweeping majesty and he increasingly the opposite.

Fricka exits leaving him in a tailspin of nihilistic depression. His Big Idea is in tatters and he longs for a precipitous end to the reign of the Gods. Dignified and fitting if possible but not essential. From King of the Gods he has become Shelley Levene.

“nur Eines will ich noch: das Ende..das Ende!”     only one thing do I still want: the end..the end!

We don’t get the end for around another thirteen hours. Good stuff.

More footie..

And on this happy note, a quick review of the Arsenal game. We’re up there with the best teams in the country. Thus far, no big Premier League club has beaten us this season. Simply amazing. The place rocked. Referees decisions go against us. Another normal day at The Boleyn. What a blinding season. Little Don, season ticket holder (missed just two home league games) and veteran of several away games this season has yet to see us lose! Effing unbelievable!

So few games left and they are all going to be crackers. Bring on Man U in the week. Check out all the Andy Carroll videos you want LVG, he’s unstoppable!

Next season in the magnificent xxxx Stadium, we in the East Stand Super Chicken Run or whatever it is, we’ll have to sing our hearts out to get close to our unique Boleyn.

If you have been, thanks for listening.

COYI!!

©DonnertheHammer.com 2016

In which Don considers the whereabouts of Alberich, the Norwich game, Dalton Trumbo, Sylvia Kristel and has cup fever.

Post 2

According to the psychoanalysts (and to be fair also some sane people), the Ring Cycle represents a human life. It starts in a safe watery place and ultimately it all returns to dust, ready to be re-cycled. Ring Cycle re-cycle – it even sounds the same, so must be right.

And who disturbs the sanctity of the womb? Why its arch baddie Alberich; right there in Act One, Scene One. His exchange with the Rheinmaidens  starts it off and sets the tone for the whole tetralogy. But is he there (alive) at the end of Götterdämmerung? I’m pretty sure I spotted his son Hagan, going under the waves of the Rhine, gasping for last breath but Dad was conspicuously absent.

So,

  1. Does it matter?
  2. If he’s not there, where/when did he go?

1.  Yes it matters. This is the guy that struck the original bargain; renouncing love to gain the power to rule the world. It also became clear that he didn’t intend his to be a benevolent rule. We had a taste in Das Rhinegold of his treatment of fellow Nibelungs where even his brother wasn’t spared the whip. So the prognosis for humans and others was not good. He tells us explicitly what is in store for women. He has renounced love but not sex and intends to force his lust upon whomsoever takes his fancy. Because for Alberich sex equals Power;  the Rhinemaidans spurned him so women will be forced. Wotan (der wuthende Rauber) robbed him, so men will know his revenge in equally violent and coercive fashion. Would he have been so horrid if not himself taunted beyond endurance by the Rhinemaidens? That consideration is for another day.

By the very end of the story, the Ring is returned to its rightful place, Brunhilde has destroyed the Gods (fulfilling Wotan’s wish?). We are back to square one in the primordial world but the clock has not been turned back; what has happened, happened. So it matters whether the arch baddie is still around awaiting his next opportunity, or is not.

2. When/where did he go?

To paraphrase Oprah Winfrey “what do we know for sure?”

He is released, cursing as he goes, by Wotan and Loge in Das Rhinegold. We hear of him but don’t see him in Die Valkyrie. In Siegfried, Wotan offers him first dibs at persuading the dragon to part with the Ring (pretty reckless of Wotan) and after a contretemps with his brother, we see him no more…or do we?

At some point, either during or before the 20 or so years between Wotan putting Brunhilde to sleep and Siegfried awakening her, we know Alberich begets a son, Hagen, by a prostitute. We don’t know if the mother is forced (his gold has been taken but presumably he is not penniless) but the son attests that she is brave and that “she yielded to his cunning.”

In the Prologue to Götterdämmerung, the first Norn asks her sisters: what happened to Alberich? tantalizingly, just as we are to get the answer, the rope snaps,  the ability to see ahead, behind and sideways is lost and we never know. One can’t help but wonder why Wagner had the rope snap on that question…

So to Act 2 in Götterdämmerung and the whole discourse between Alberich and his son Hagan. All we know of this for sure is that it is heavy with ambiguity! The overriding impression is that father appears to son in a dream but if that is not so and if he is really there at that point in the proceedings, Wagner must have intended that he survive the immolation because nothing afterward indicates to the contrary.

There is no doubt Hagen is asleep (for sure at the beginning): the stage direction says so. That doesn’t mean Alberich is not there, though it may suggest so. If he is not there, it means Hagan is dreaming of a having a dream (because it is not a normal conversation; Alberich is wishing him a nice sleep). Can one dream about having a dream? Could Hagan be asleep initially, wake up but pretend to still be sleeping? I really don’t see the point of that; surely they’d just have a normal conversation.

So here’s a test: If its all in Hagan’s head, he could not learn anything he doesn’t already know. Does he?

What does Alberich tell him?

  1. That he was robbed by Wotan whose power has since waned. That surely is not news to the son. Presumably they had discussed the revenge plan ad nauseam as it was what Hagan was born to execute.
  2. That there is a wise women (Brunhilde) that may urge Siegfried to return the Ring to the Rhine (and so spoil the Alberich/Hagen plot). Of course Hagen knows all about Brunhilde but surely not in such detail that he would know of her attitude toward the Ring? The only people who discuss that with Brunhilde (on stage) are Siegfried, her sister Valkyrie, Waltraute and maybe much, much earlier, Wotan. However, I don’t think Alberich is telling Hagan that Brunhilde would urge Siegfried to return the Ring to its rightful owner, he is conjecturing that she might. There is no indication that either Hagan or Alberich previously met Brunhilde but it is realistic that news of her bravery and wisdom has spread, so no definite new knowledge here. [By the way, I am prepared to accept that the world no longer knows she is the former demigod, daughter of Wotan, otherwise surely that point would have come up here].
  3. That Siegfried doesn’t know the true power of the Ring and treats it as a trinket. We know this at least has the potential to be untrue because in Siegfried Act Two, Scene Two, the Woodbird tells Siegfried that with the Ring he can rule the world. Did Seigfried take this seriously? The stage direction is “quietly and with emotion” which I think suggests sincerity and he replies, “My thanks for your counsel my dear little bird, I gladly shall follow your call.” Siegfried will shortly stress test the Woodbird’s other claim that Mime is a fraud and that turned out to be correct and moreover, he seeks Brunhilde because the Woodbird says so. So it is very likely that Siegfried accepts the Woodbird’s credentials and so knew in the previous opera that the Ring was no mere trinket; but rather, something extremely powerful.

So why did Alberich say something untrue to Hagan, or if it was all in Hagan’s head, why did he make this mistake? I’m not sure but what is germane to this post is did this information inform Hagan of something he didn’t previously know? if so, Alberich must have really spoken to him. I cannot find anything definitive.

By the end of Act 1 Götterdämmerung, both Siegfried and Brunhilde are aware of the Ring’s significance so Alberich is in the dream passing on old (and by this time inaccurate) news concerning Siegfried. I can’t find evidence that this signifies anything other than not all characters are kept up to speed in real time, which simply reflects real life.

Bottom line is I can find no smoking gun either way. One wonders therefore at the point of the scene at all. Bearing in mind the dastardly plan is already underway, how are we helped by understanding that Hagan is doing it for himself and not for Dad? Unless the very point is the implication that Dad is still around…?

On the basis that I don’t see him die and I am troubled by the concept of dreaming of having a dream, I am going to conclude he is really there. But its hardly convincing.

Either way, I suspect Wagner did not want to close the door on the possibility of the baddies (in whatever guise) returning. If he wanted a happy ending, Brunhilde and Siegfried would have returned the Ring to the Rhine in triumph, glory and love. But that’s too easy. Whilst at the end of Götterdämmerung, we are all redeemed through Brunhilde’s supreme and selfless sacrifice and we are optimistic of a better world, we also have a nagging concern that this brave new world is just as susceptible to the corrupting influence of Alberich, or someone quite like him. And so we Re-cycle..

Phew!

        

Naarwich away. Didn’t get to this. In fact I only heard it up to half time. Mrs Donner, sniffing retribution for my recent absence at Anfield and the impending one at Ewood Park, gave me a look that meant one thing and one thing only: DTH was in for some pre-Valentine’s Day shopping in Islington followed by a bit of Dalton Trumbo at the Arthouse, Crouch End. As it transpired, both company and film were pretty good. The film was actually very good (as was the company – oh shit..). If you suspected that John Wayne was a wanker but weren’t sure why, go and see this. Stars the excellent Bryan Cranston and the magnificent Louis CK . So phone switched off promptly at 16:00 and I was reconnected with the world at 18:15. You know how you want to re-live it in normal time but real life gets in the way (Likely Lads style)? So the first thing I saw was a tweet how Moses turned the game and I got all excited (a bit much in the Arthouse) about a win, before the slightly anticlimactictical  realisation of 2-2 draw. Still the West Ham spirit, don’t know when we’re beaten  etc. etc.

First outing for Emenike. Welcome to WHU Emmanuel. [aah Sylvia Kristel…behave Don] May you score a hatful of goals in claret and blue and mainly against Spurs.

In my goodbye to Carl Jenkinson last time, I forgot the equally valued Mauro Zarate. Little Don and I went to Goodison last season, when he came on from the bench and ran the game – naturally we lost but an heroic defeat. Not sure why he’s gone, especially for such little money. Suspect its to do with FFP and the Carrick deal (from 10 years ago!).

Getting a bit excited re FA Cup. We’re part of the seven thousand trekking north at weekend. In hope and expectation. Gosh! Good luck Slaven and the boys. Will we see anything of Sakho and Lanzini?

Wrapping it up there. I doubt anyone will read this but if you have, well done.

Donner the Hammer

COYI!

 

©DonnertheHammer.com 2016